Protocol for Balancing Care for Self and Care for Others

Protocol for Balancing Care for Self and Care for Others

Happy Imbolc! Today marks the halfway point between Winter Solstice and Spring Equinox. On this day, you are invited to turn your thoughts toward spring and ask yourself: What would I like to grow in my garden this year? This inquiry includes the garden outside as well as the garden inside.

Last Sunday, I co-facilitated a Witch’s Hygge: an event where women gather to talk, to craft, and to eat. During the circle, we asked the women to connect with a dream, vision, or intention they wished to explore in the upcoming year. (A very Imbolc-type question) After the responses were shared, I asked the women if they noticed any themes or patterns in the responses. One woman said…

Time Sickness: The next time you catch yourself saying you are “busy” try this…

Time Sickness: The next time you catch yourself saying you are “busy” try this…

Recently a colleague and I were discussing a reoccurring theme among the people to whom we provide counseling: a theme best described as “time sickness.” Time sickness is a term originally coined in 1982 by Larry Dossey, author and physician, who defined time sickness as:

“The belief that… time is always slipping away, that there is never enough of it, and that we must go faster and faster to keep up.”

This definition of time sickness reminds me of the three money myths Lynn Twist outlines in her book Soul of Money. They are:

Encouraging unity within ourselves and among each other.

Encouraging unity within ourselves and among each other.

This week feels like a fresh start. On Friday we experience a new solar cycle and on Saturday we begin a new lunar cycle both in the sign of Aquarius.

One way to acknowledge these new beginnings is to look at the context in which they are happening. Both the solar and the lunar cycles occur in the middle of the winter season, a time of the year when growth is dormant and focus is inward. Winter is the opposite of outward expansion, rather winter invites us to go within and listen.

Another consideration to enhance our understanding of this time of year is to…

A Quick Practice for Getting Back into Alignment

A Quick Practice for Getting Back into Alignment

Thirteen years ago, when I was naming the center, I considered “Shakti Power.” I wanted the center’s name to convey the benefits of connecting with and using Shakti energy. Even though I chose a different name, the intention behind “Shakti Power” continues to inform the work I do at the center.

Imagine my delight when I discovered…

What to consider if you are wanting to make a change in your life. (Willpower is not the problem.)

What to consider if you are wanting to make a change in your life. (Willpower is not the problem.)

I suspect one reason New Year resolutions are so attractive is because humans have an “innate need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.” (Pink, p.10) As Daniel Pink uncovered in his book, Drive, humans are motivated by autonomy or self-direction, mastery or the desire to get better at something, and purpose or linking one’s desires in the service of a cause greater than oneself.

Pink did a great job explaining what motivates us, and as many of us know, motivation in and of itself is not enough to affect change. If motivation were enough, then almost ALL of us would complete our New Year resolutions to our satisfaction.

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