Our bodies are not an apology.

Our bodies are not an apology.

Let’s pause for a moment and take a deep breath. Our bodies are not an apology. Let those words sink in. What is coming up for you as you absorb this message?

Are you remembering all the times you apologized for yourself? All the times, you apologized for being too heavy or too skinny, too big or too small, too pale or too dark. Are you remembering all the times you justified why you moved a certain way, or why you needed more food or less food, or why you were attracted to certain people?

Or maybe you are reflecting on how much time has passed…

A Recipe for a Learner’s Mindset

A Recipe for a Learner’s Mindset

As I write, much-needed rain is falling. The cracks in the earth are slowly filling and the drooping plants are rising. I am grateful for this welcome break of the dry spell.

I recently heard Aiko Bethea, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) educator, attorney, and executive coach, speak about the benefits of adopting a Learner’s Mindset. Because her words were so moving and her message applicable to so many different areas of our lives, I decided to share my understanding with you.

Exploring the difference between values and beliefs.

Exploring the difference between values and beliefs.

Since last week’s article about Emotional Agility seemed to be a big hit, I thought I would follow up with an article about the difference between values and beliefs. Understanding the difference between what we value and what we believe is an important distinction to make and informs how we make decisions.

A value is a concept or principle we hold dear. Values signal what we think is important and often serve as a rubric for how we behave.

4 steps toward emotional agility.

4 steps toward emotional agility.

Emotional agility, a phrase coined by Harvard psychologist Dr. Susan David, is “the ability to be with yourself, your thoughts, your difficult emotions, sadness, fear, and anger in a way that is curious and compassionate, but without allowing yourself to be derailed by those emotions.” #goals

Doesn’t that sound lovely? If your answer is “yes,” then enclosed are my notes from a Dare to Lead podcast in which Brene Brown interviews Susan David. I found Susan David’s research fascinating and especially appreciated her description of “toxic positivity.”

Challenging your story.

Challenging your story.

In a recent interview Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit and Smarter, Faster, Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business, described a psychological state called “cognitive tunneling.”

Cognitive tunneling is responding without thinking: a natural reaction when stressed or scared. In the moment of overwhelm – when it is difficult to think clearly and deeply – the tendency is to respond to the most obvious stimuli.

For example, we hear a smoke alarm sound. Do we focus on finding a way to turn off the alarm or do we seek the source of smoke? If we choose to turn off the alarm first, then we miss an opportunity to address the more serious threat of fire…

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